sQRikebeam bor fow

Ich bin auch ein Fahrrad, -or- Bikescream for QRow

-or- traffic jam session

Recommendation: Watch the video clip while listening to the sound:

The participants made sounds with the bikestruments and formed them with their voices through the Anthropomorfer. When working with the sounds via smartphones, how could we do with only very little space? I hadn’t prepared a silver concept for that part. Somehow someone came up with the idea to follow the passing cars, bikes and people with the sounds. So each participant chose one feature, for instance “everything yellow”, and each time a yellow car, bike og hat passed by, he/she would ‘follow’ the moving object with the sound, panning from left to right or vice versa. In this way, a new aspect was introduced in the the-street-as-an-instrument-concept: SILENCE!! Since there were not yellow things passing by all the time the participant following yellow things had to keep silent in the pauses. But since each participant followed his/her specific feature, – bike helmets, taxis, blondes, etc., a great variety of movements and velocities naturally came to the improvisations, thus creating variation and new mixes/collisions. QRaaaaa QRaaaa!

Related articles:

Bikestruharp, former bike now instrument (www.akutsk.wordpress.com)

Bikestruments, bridgestruments, anti padlock guerilla (www.akutsk.wordpress.com)

Ceci n’est pas une pub. This is not a commercial.

ImageThis qr code links to a recording of a street improvisation by ordinary passers by, facilitated by Akutsk, using the Anthropomorfer. Sound graffiti you may call it, I use the name fonografiti. When using a qr code, we embark on the colonisation of the still rather virginal web based virtual track of the street.

Although the medium is sonorous, the access to the location specific electro acoustic collective improvisation necessarily passes through the visual. The qr code must catch your attention before it can work as a key to the virtual audio track of the place.

QR codes are in many cases used in commercial contexts, and the first thing we need to do is to decolonise this technology from the logic of the market. I’ve met a good deal of people not aware that you can easily make these codes yourself. Using qr codes is probably the easiest way for anyone to interact (virtually) in the street through sound, – and any other media btw.

In order to make sure that people understand that this specific qr code is not a commercial – ceci n’est pas une pub – we must add something, visually, to the code itself. Streetsoundartist Medlyd uses CD boxes on which he paints the QR code. Using a technique that cannot be subject to mass production, Medlyd succeeds in communicating the non-commerciality of the code. And a CD box connotes music. It’s a CD release!

In this photo you see a stencil of a hooded crow on top of a paste up of a QR code measuring 15×15 cm. The obvious handy craft side to the work makes it obvious that this is not commercial, it is ‘street’.

Now scan the code! We won’t sell you anything. We want to share a unique piece of sound art improvised on this specific location using only sounds from this place.

Ceci n’est pas une pub.

Knippels bridge being streetstrumentalized, though momentarily interrupted by rain

Bikestruments, bridgestruments, anti padlock guerilla

Bike bells on bridge (anti padlock guerilla)

From bike to trike (?)

From bi- to tri-

Bike bone hanging in bike nerve being attached by bike magnet

Preparing bikestruments in the State Workshops for Art

Help I’m a bike. Curate me !

So it’s official. I’ve often wondered what I should call what I’m doing. Well. It’s art.

I’ve found out that my participation in a sound art project at the Knippels Bridge (a bridge connecting main Copenhagen with the island of Amager), is in fact part of Copenhagen art festival 2012.

Being a part of a part of something to do with art, I’ve been given the possibility to use the “national workshops for art”. So now I’m chopping up old bikes in the official national workshops for art, and therefore I’m making ….. art!

Art art art art art.

In the outset I was planning on doing what whomever could do, namely take parts of old bikes and set them up in the street, and in this particular case a bridge.

It was supposed to be a sort of ignition fuelling a trend where people start putting up things in public space that can serve as  “streetstruments”, inspiring to engage in collective activities around sound.

The need to hang things in public space is strong, judging from the padlocks that people put everywhere, inadvertently enhancing the omnipresent focus in public space on reproduction. Well instead of (biological and other) reproduction, streetstruments should inspire people to engage in productive action beyond the twosomeness of the nuclear family and co.

And now I do art. Which is the same as saying I’m a name and a nationality. As in “John Cage (USA)”. Although I have been invited to participate in the festival, I’m not in the programme, for some reason,  – as opposed to John Cage. Looking forward to meet him.

I haven’t even been curated. The so-called curator, curating the sound art events at the Knippels Bridge hasn’t contacted me. So I have not had the chance to adhere to some sort of ‘overall concept’, which is generally the way these things work.

So I’m only halfway participating in the festival. Which makes me a halfway artist. And what I’m doing is consequently halfway art.

Which in the end might save my project.

Since it is not really art after all, then it is not really mostly an individualistic project promoting its creator, who is in the programme with a name and nationality (dead or alive), and who has been curated according to the overall so-called concept of the festival, which in the case of Copenhagen Art Festival 2012 is “Art in community”, a concept which is put into play through a large number of individual artists’ individual artworks in (mostly) solo exhibitions.

Since I’m not really an artist after all, I’m not really an expert producer of works of art, that the consumers-recipients-of-works-of-art will consume, after appropriately being guided by an expert knower-of-art or curator. Therefore there is a smaller risk that what I’m doing could not be done by anyone, and that it will actually be done by someone, that there will be people using the street as an instrument, without being curated, without having their name and nationality in a programme.

street improvisation; field for collective improvisation

Collective street improvisations, – how do we get people involved?

How can you start a new trend, create changes in other people’s lives, making them start doing things no-one has done before? How can you make more people start doing what only few people did before?

The basic goal of all my activities in the ongoing process I call Akutsk, is to inspire people who are not professional musicians or composers to work with sound as a means of expression in a creative, reflected and situated way.

I’m pursuing a bottom up approach, where I use the street as a place where people are presented with the methods/technologies for collective street improvisations, through workshops and flash mob inspired interventions.

With the workshop concept,  I aim at making a number of 3 hours workshops in local communities, starting by the ones close to where I live. The main target group consists of young people aged 13 – 16, a central criteria of success being to engage young people from not-so-well-off neighbourhoods.

How can I engage young people in taking part in collective street improvisations? I have three strategies:

  1. Go through the adults they trust. Pedagogues in the youth club, teachers, neighbourhood workers, etc. The challenge is to actually get in touch with these people, they seem to be always busy
  2. Participants from one workshop are invited to participate in the next one. This helps overcome the shyness, and it can also create new connections between young people from different neighbourhoods. And it empowers the ones who participate the second time, giving them a role as peer trainers.
  3. Have a group of facilitators, young adults by preference, that help on the workshops, giving the example of the work flow of the method. It’s always easier to engage in something, when you can see how it works.

The largest barrier to inspire people to get involved in these activities lies of course in the answer to the question ‘what’s in it for me?’. Since there is no money involved, I have to come up with something else. For the participants in the workshop, the answer would be, that it provides them with new means of expression through sound. It gives them a framework, as a collective, in which they can create something unique out of the sounds that are there at a given time and place. And the ‘something’ they create leaves a mark on the place in the form of a QR code. The participants can tell others about this moment by referring to the QR code. In addition, the process itself is fun, it’s playful, physical, and the way we work with the material is flexible, personal and situated. At least this is what I believe!!

The main challenge is to make people pass the barrier of shyness, and of why-should-I-start-doing-this-stupid-thing-ness. We all experience these situations from time to time, where someone wants us to do something in front of others that seem awkward and unnatural in the moment. My solution is to

  1. have a set-up that is simple. What meets the participant is: a quadrangular field. Two microphones, one set of headphones. A smartphone in his/her hand.
  2. have a set of play rules that are simple. There might be a weak point to my concept here, though I think that newcomers can quite rapidly get the hang of it. It consists of 4 steps:
    1. find a sound, explore the area for interesting ‘streetstruments’
    2. record it (by tapping your smartphone)
    3. form your sound with your voice (after putting on the headphones and turning your smartphone upside down)
    4. move yourself and your phrase in the quadrangular collective improvisational field (by using your smartphone as a remote control turning up/down the volume and the panning of your phrase)
  3. Have a couple of people who already know the processes start up the activities, and gradually make new participants replace them.

street improvisation; field for collective improvisation

Two days ago, I got an answer from the local community centre in a neighbourhood called Valby, that they accepted my application for two workshops. The workshops are set to August 2012. I also have a pilot workshop in collaboration with the Copenhagen Jazz Festival, July 6. I still wait for the answer to 4 additional workshops, but in any case, I will be making improvised street ‘interventions’ whenever I have the time for it. In total this gives a fair number of occasions, where the magic can begin. And it gives a basis for a group of volunteers to work for the project.

This is the next step: Starting up a group of volunteers or ‘fonografists’. I think there are a number of reasons why someone would want to get involved in this project. First of all, it is something new. Working with sound in street art is very little developed, since it has been to complicated and expensive until now, and being part of a movement towards a new form of expression is simply extremely inspiring. Being a voluntary in this project also means experimenting with how to extend the ordinary way you use your voice and body into a form in which you can develop a sound improvisation in a collective. And it means guiding others in doing so. It means experiences in how to develop the tools and methods for involving non-musicians in working with sound as a means for expression. And then there are the additional experiences in documenting, communicating, organisational development, fundraising, etc. But most of all, there is the kick in making events at unexpected places, to create occasions where magic can enter in our everyday lives.

Quotations: Lefebvre on the living disorder of the street.